If a global pandemic of avian flu were to break out, the developing countries would not have access to influenza vaccine. Indeed, global stocks of vaccines have been frozen for the entire first year following the outbreak of the epidemic, because of contracts signed between developed countries and the multinational pharmaceutical industry. These contracts ensure their priority and privileged access to vaccines. Some countries like Indonesia choose the path of resistance, refusing to share H5N1 virus strains. For Indonesia’s minister of health, there is no question of such strains available to the pharmaceutical industry will use to make vaccines that are country can not afford…

Public health in poor countries and finds himself trapped in a market economy. A primary finding was prepared in 1994 by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) estimates that 5.4 billion dollars a year, losses from developing countries in royalties on pharmaceuticals. The manufacturers do not use a specific strategy, which have more to do since they are protected by law at the expense of patients. Indeed, drugs are protected against competition by patent for 20 years. With this protection, the firm can maintain a high price that allows it to fund research, advertising, shareholders and ensure profits.